Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital

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Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital's Addiction Recovery Program offers a comprehensive array of clinical services for individuals seeking recovery from alcohol and other drug addictions. Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital is located in Boston, Massachusetts.

Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital Focus:

Substance Abuse

Substance Abuse Treatment Centers focus on helping individuals recover from substance abuse, including alcohol and drug addiction (both illegal and prescription drugs). They often include the opportunity to engage in both individual as well as group therapy.

Opiate Addiction

Opiate Addiction Treatment Centers specialize in supporting those recovering from opioid addiction. They treat those suffering from addiction to illegal opioids like heroin, as well as prescription drugs like oxycodone. These centers typically combine both physical as well as mental and emotional support to help stop addiction. Physical support often includes medical detox and subsequent medical support (including medication), and mental support includes in-depth therapy to address the underlying causes of addiction.

Alcoholism

The goal of treatment for alcoholism is abstinence. Those with poor social support, poor motivation, or psychiatric disorders tend to relapse within a few years of treatment. For these people, success is measured by longer periods of abstinence, reduced use of alcohol, better health, and improved social functioning. Recovery and Maintenance are usually based on 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Dual Diagnosis/Co-Occurring Disorders Treatment

Many of those suffering from addiction also suffer from mental or emotional illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety disorders. BWFH's Dual Diagnosis Partial Hospital Program is a 10-day program that addresses the needs of patients who have both substance use and psychiatric disorders. The program runs from 8:30 am to 2:45 pm, Monday through Friday. You will be cared for by a multidisciplinary team of experienced addiction psychiatrists and licensed clinical social workers.

Rehab Services:

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) | SAMHSA

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the use of medications along with counseling and therapy to treat substance abuse. MAT is mainly used to treat opioid addictions (i.e. heroin and/or prescription drugs like OxyContin or Vicodin). Medications like buprenorphine are used in MAT to help normalize brain chemistry, block the effects of alcohol and/or opioids, relieve cravings, and stabilize body functions, making sobriety easier to maintain. All medications used are approved by the FDA, and every MAT program is tailored to the patient’s specific needs.

Buprenorphine used for Detox and Treatment

Suboxone is a medication used to treat opioid addiction and can also help with pain control. Suboxone has two components; Buprenorphine and Naloxone. Buprenorphine is an opiate partial agonsist, which means that it partially binds to the opioid receptor, but not to the same degree as other opioids. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which is not absorbed orally. So if taken under your tongue, it does not take effect.

Vivitrol

VIVITROL® is an injectable prescription medicine used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence. Administered only with medical approval, VIVITROL blocks opioid receptors in the brain, which helps reduce cravings and prevent relapse. VIVITROL is non-addictive and extended-release, so it only needs to be taken once a month. Before starting VIVITROL, you must be opioid-free for at least 7-10 days in order to avoid sudden opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an FDA-approved medication used to treat opioid and alcohol addiction. Naltrexone helps reduce cravings and prevent relapse, making recovery easier. It comes either in pill form (ReVia, Depade), taken once a day; or in an injectable form (Vivitrol), administered monthly. Patients must not have any illegal opioids or opioid medication in their system for at least 7-10 days before starting naltrexone (this includes methadone, so if you’re switching from methadone to naltrexone, you must wait until your system is clear).

Psychotropic Medication

Psychotropic medications (aka psychodynamic medication) are any medicines used specifically to affect and/or alter a patient's mind, emotions, and behaviors. Such psychiatric medicines are often used to change chemical levels in the brain that impact a person's mood and behavior. These medications include mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anti-ADHD drugs, and anti-anxiety medications.

What does Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital offer?

Medically Assisted Detox

Drug and alcohol addiction often takes a heavy toll on one's body. Over time, a physical dependence can develop, meaning the body physiologically needs the substance to function. Detox is the process of removing drugs and/or alcohol from the body, a process that can be lethal if mismanaged. Medical detox is done by licensed medical professionals who monitor vital signs and keep you safe, healthy, and as comfortable as possible as you go through detox and withdrawal.

24 Hour Clinical Care

At certain points in the recovery process, it's important to have support available 24/7. 24-hour clinical care offers a safe environment in which to recover from drug or alcohol addiction in peace, knowing medical detox and other treatment will happen with professionals on hand.

Intensive Outpatient (IOP)

Intensive Outpatient programs are for those who want or need a very structured treatment program but who also wish to live at home and continue with certain responsibilities (such as work or school). IOP substance abuse treatment programs vary in duration and intensity, and certain outpatient rehab centers will offer individualized treatment programs.

Outpatient (OP)

Outpatient programs are for those seeking mental rehab or drug rehab, but who also stay at home every night. The main difference between outpatient treatment (OP) and intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) lies in the amount of hours the patient spends at the facility. Most of the time an outpatient program is designed for someone who has completed an inpatient stay and is looking to continue their growth in recovery. Outpatient is not meant to be the starting point, it is commonly referred to as aftercare.

Residential (inpatient) Treatment

Residential treatment programs are those that offer housing and meals in addition to substance abuse treatment. Rehab facilities that offer residential treatment allow patients to focus solely on recovery, in an environment totally separate from their lives. Some rehab centers specialize in short-term residential treatment (a few days to a week or two), while others solely provide treatment on a long-term basis (several weeks to months). Some offer both, and tailor treatment to the patient's individual requirements.

Treatment Types:

SMART Recovery

SMART (Self-Management & Recovery Training) is a method addiction recovery, often seen as an “alternative” to 12-step programs. It emphasizes 4 core areas: Building Motivation, Coping with Urges, Problem Solving, and Lifestyle Balance. The SMART approach views substance use as a dysfunctional habit (not a disease), emphasizes the latest scientific research on addiction, and believes each individual finds his/her own path to recovery. Notably, relapses are seen as a normal part of the change cycle and good learning experiences if handled properly. SMART can be put to use anywhere (any rehab facility or group).

Holistic Treatment

Rather than focusing solely on addiction, holistic treatment facilities treat patients in terms of their whole being. Holistic treatment is about more than just addiction and sobriety – it addresses the person’s life in its entirety, including career, physical, familial, and spiritual aspects.

Individualized Treatment

Each patient seeking recovery from alcohol and other drug addiction is different. At the Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program, they recognize every patient as an individual who deserves to be treated with dignity, care and respect.

12-Step

12-step programs are addiction recovery models based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). A number of substance abuse programs (including some drug and alcohol rehab centers) use the 12 steps as a basis for treatment. Beginning steps involve admitting powerlessness over the addiction and creating a spiritual basis for recovery. Middle steps including making direct amends to those who've been hurt by the addiction, and the final step is to assist others in addiction recovery in the same way. 12-Step offshoots including Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Cocaine Anonymous (CA), Dual Recovery Anonymous (DRA), Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA) and Gamblers Anonymous (GA).

Aftercare Support

Completing a drug or alcohol rehab program shouldn't spell the end of substance abuse treatment. Aftercare involves making a sustainable plan for recovery, including ongoing support. This can include sober living arrangements like halfway houses, career counseling, and setting a patient up with community programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA).

Therapies Offered:

Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy (aka guided hypnosis) can be used as a therapeutic modality to treat substance use, especially in terms of quitting smoking cigarettes (nicotine). Clinical hypnotherapists help clients turn their attention inward, accessing unconscious or subconscious material, and then make suggestions that are healthier for the individual. The process can help clients make deep, positive, and lasting changes, including ceasing addictive habits.

Family Therapy

Research clearly demonstrates that recovery is far more successful and sustainable when loved ones like family members participate in rehab and substance abuse treatment. Genetic factors may be at play when it comes to drug and alcohol addiction, as well as mental health issues. Family dynamics often play a critical role in addiction triggers, and if properly educated, family members can be a strong source of support when it comes to rehabilitation.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a therapy modality that focuses on the relationship between one's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. It is used to establish and allow for healthy responses to thoughts and feelings (instead of unhealthy responses, like using drugs or alcohol). CBT has been proven effective for recovering addicts of all kinds, and is used to strengthen a patient's own self-awareness and ability to self-regulate. CBT allows individuals to monitor their own emotional state, become more adept at communicating with others, and manage stress without needing to engage in substance abuse.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a modified form of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), a treatment designed to help people understand and ultimately affect the relationship between their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. DBT is often used for individuals who struggle with self-harm behaviors, such as self-mutilation (cutting) and suicidal thoughts, urges, or attempts. It has been proven clinically effective for those who struggle with out-of-control emotions and mental health illnesses like Borderline Personality Disorder.

Individual Therapy

In individual therapy, a patient meets one-on-one with a trained psychologist or counselor. Therapy is a pivotal part of effective substance abuse treatment, as it often covers root causes of addiction, including challenges faced by the patient in their social, family, and work/school life.

Trauma Therapy

Trauma therapy addresses traumatic incidents from a client's past that are likely affecting their present-day experience. Trauma is often one of the primary triggers and potential causes of addiction, and can stem from child sexual abuse, domestic violence, having a parent with a mental illness, losing one or both parents at a young age, teenage or adult sexual assault, or any number of other factors. The purpose of trauma therapy is to allow a patient to process trauma and move through and past it, with the help of trained and compassionate mental health professionals.

Group Therapy

Group therapy is any therapeutic work that happens in a group (not one-on-one). There are a number of different group therapy modalities, including support groups, experiential therapy, psycho-education, and more. Group therapy involves treatment as well as processing interaction between group members.

Couples Therapy

Whether a marriage or other committed relationship, an intimate partnership is one of the most important aspects of a person's life. Drug and alcohol addiction affects both members of a couple in deep and meaningful ways, as does rehab and recovery. Couples therapy and other couples-focused treatment programs are significant parts of exploring triggers of addiction, as well as learning how to build healthy patterns to support ongoing sobriety.

Experiential Therapy

Experiential therapy is a form of therapy in which clients are encouraged to surface and work through subconscious issues by engaging in real-time experiences. Experiential therapy departs from traditional talk therapy by involving the body, and having clients engage in activities, movements, and physical and emotional expression. This can involve role-play or using props (which can include other people). Experiential therapy can help people process trauma, memories, and emotion quickly, deeply, and in a lasting fashion, leading to substantial and impactful healing.

Nutrition Therapy

Nutrition therapy, aka medical nutrition therapy (MNT), is a way of treating physical, emotional, and medical conditions through diet. Specific dietary plans are designed by professional nutritionists or registered dietitians, and patients follow them in order to positively affect their physical and mental health.

Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT)

Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is a way of getting nicotine into the bloodstream without smoking. It uses products that supply low doses of nicotine to help people stop smoking. The goal of therapy is to cut down on cravings for nicotine and ease the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal.

Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital Highlights:

The program's experienced team of doctors, nurse practitioners and nurses are specially trained in addiction recovery treatment. To aid patients' withdrawal and recovery, the treatment team stays abreast of and applies the latest breakthroughs in addiction medicine. Clinical staff members also provide patients with information about HIV, smoking cessation, nutrition and general health issues.
Their team is unique in that it brings together experts from the field of medicine, psychiatry, and addiction, which gives them the ability to care for patients with both addiction and co-existing medical and/or psychiatric illnesses.
The Evening Dual Diagnosis Program, through Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital’s Addiction Recovery Program (ARP), provides support and education throughout the crucial first three weeks of recovery from chemical dependency. The Evening Dual Diagnosis Program allows working adults to continue meeting their day-time responsibilities while receiving intensive outpatient treatment.
Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital strives to attain excellence in patient care services, provided in a learning environment with dignity, compassion and respect.
They believe addiction is a treatable disorder, and that care provided by compassionate professionals in an environment of support and mutual respect heightens patients' self-esteem and promotes medical, emotional, spiritual and social recovery. Their goal is not only to promote abstinence and recovery from chemical dependency and its effects, but also to assist patients in achieving the highest level of human potential.
Private
Residential Area
Meditation
Recreation room

Intake:

  • Men and Women Allowed
  • Facility for Adults and Young Adults
  • Beds Available: 24
  • Treatment Duration: 84 days
  • Smoking is not allowed during the treatment
  • Bilingual therapists and staff
  • Special programs for patients with HIV or AIDS

Payment:

  • Sliding Fee Scale
  • Private Health Insurance
  • Military insurance coverage
  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • State financed or Low cost Treatment
  • Treatment financing available
  • Cash, Credit or Debit card accepted

Rehabs in Massachusetts

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  • Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital 200 Springs Road Bedford, MA 01730
  • McLean Hospital 115 Mill street Belmont, MA 02478
  • Recovery Centers of America - Village Inn Road 9 Village Inn Road Westminster, MA 01473
  • Veterans Community Care Center - Marshall Road 130 Marshall Road Lowell, MA 01852