Oxford House Serenity Lane

2708 West Avenue
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Oxford House Catalyst is a non-profit house located in Montgomery, AL. The Oxford House has a unique concept in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. Each sober living home is democratically run, self-supporting and drug-free home.

Overview:

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The Oxford House Catalyst believes in three things: self-help is the bedrock of recovery, disciplined democracy is key to living together, and self-support builds efficacy in order to avoid relapse.

A group of six or more recovering individuals is granted the right to call themselves an Oxford House and to use the Oxford House system, which has three basic conditions – democratically self-run, self-supported and expulsion of any resident who returns to using.

An individual may come into an Oxford House following a 28-day rehabilitation program or at least a 5 to 10-day detoxification program.

Admissions:

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Beds Available : 8

Programs for Men

Young Adult Programs

Adult Programs

Military Programs

Financials:

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Self-pay Options

Level of Care:

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Sober Living Homes:

Sober Living Houses (SLHs), aka sober homes or halfway houses, are safe, substance-free, supportive living facilities for those recovering from substance abuse. Ideal for those who've just been through inpatient or outpatient treatment, SLHs are supervised environments with rules that support sobriety, such as curfews, shared chores, and therapeutic meetings. Residents are also often trained on life skills and coping skills to make it easier to transition into society. SLHs also provide a strong sense of community that can lead to the kind of deep and lasting connections with other sober individuals that supports a new, healthy lifestyle.

12-Step:

12-step programs are addiction recovery models based on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). A number of substance abuse programs (including some drug and alcohol rehab centers) use the 12 steps as a basis for treatment. Beginning steps involve admitting powerlessness over the addiction and creating a spiritual basis for recovery. Middle steps including making direct amends to those who've been hurt by the addiction, and the final step is to assist others in addiction recovery in the same way. 12-Step offshoots including Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Cocaine Anonymous (CA), Dual Recovery Anonymous (DRA), Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA) and Gamblers Anonymous (GA).

Individualized Treatment:

Certain drug and alcohol rehabs have standard treatment regimes they expect all patients to follow. Others offer individualized treatment, meaning they tailor treatment to a person's specific background and needs. For example, a rehab facility may adjust a treatment program to take into account the type of drug or addiction from which the person suffers, their age, medical condition(s), religious beliefs, or lifestyle.

Aftercare Support:

Completing a drug or alcohol rehab program shouldn't spell the end of substance abuse treatment. Aftercare involves making a sustainable plan for recovery, including ongoing support. This can include sober living arrangements like halfway houses, career counseling, and setting a patient up with community programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA).

Treatment Focus:

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Opioid Addiction:

Opioid rehabs specialize in supporting those recovering from opioid addiction. They treat those suffering from addiction to illegal opioids like heroin, as well as prescription drugs like oxycodone. These centers typically combine both physical as well as mental and emotional support to help stop addiction. Physical support often includes medical detox and subsequent medical support (including medication), and mental support includes in-depth therapy to address the underlying causes of addiction.

Alcoholism:

The goal of treatment for alcoholism is abstinence. Those with poor social support, poor motivation, or psychiatric disorders tend to relapse within a few years of treatment. For these people, success is measured by longer periods of abstinence, reduced use of alcohol, better health, and improved social functioning. Recovery and Maintenance are usually based on 12 step programs and AA meetings.

Substance Abuse:

Substance rehabs focus on helping individuals recover from substance abuse, including alcohol and drug addiction (both illegal and prescription drugs). They often include the opportunity to engage in both individual as well as group therapy.

Dual Diagnosis:

Many of those suffering from addiction also suffer from mental or emotional illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or anxiety disorders. Rehab and other substance abuse facilities treating those with a dual diagnosis or co-occurring disorder administer psychiatric treatment to address the person's mental health issue in addition to drug and alcohol rehabilitation.

Therapy Programs:

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Group Therapy:

Group therapy is any therapeutic work that happens in a group (not one-on-one). There are a number of different group therapy modalities, including support groups, experiential therapy, psycho-education, and more. Group therapy involves treatment as well as processing interaction between group members.

Amenities:

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Residential Setting
Private Setting

Contact:

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Oxford House Serenity Lane
Last Updated: 05/23/2019

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